Month: August 2013

I am an Artist


“Let
each man exercise the art he knows.”- Aristophanes



I may have gotten my first
cell phone somewhere around 1999 or 2000. Because of the habit I have
of losing or misplacing things, I made sure it and others had my name
and number on or in their display. Out of the many I have had, I have
only lost two, maybe three but never had gotten calls if they had
been found.

Three to four weeks ago, I updated my smart phone. The
first thing I did was to place my name and number in the display.
Three days into this newest phone, I went to make a call. Like the
past 14 or so years of perhaps thousands of calls and texts, the
first thing to greet me and anyone is my name and number. My eyes and
attention became locked on the number, my jaw dropped.


After around 14 years, it
clicked. I had been placing, not my home phone, but the cell numbers
itself on or in these phones, lol! The only call the finder would
make is back to the lost phone.




Sunday, August 4, 2013


I
was standing, looking down a long shoreline in the darkness of night.
A large body of water lay to my left, while tall, thick dark foliage
ran parallel some 30 or more feet from the waters edge to my right. I
could see the shore curving into the water for several miles until a
bend to the right took it out of my sight.


I
looked out over the water, what I now think was the sea. Sparse but
bright stars, brighter than Earth’s, shone down and reflected off
the water from above. However, even in their own brightness, there
seemed to be more light here than the stars could be putting out or
 maybe just a celestial vision which gave me the ability to see
at night.


There
was something familiar about this place. I had only been there for a
few seconds when the recognition came to me, Oblong
(
http://expandurmind.com/2011/05/28/oblong.aspx).
A world I visited nearly two years ago.


I
had given the world the name due to the oblong shape of the sun that
I believed this world orbited. Even then I was not sure it was
elongated or just two suns close enough to look like one but  now
there was no sign of the sun, only  the foliage and shoreline
along with the quiet, undisturbed scenery seemed the same.  


Returning
to a place I had been before is nothing new, I have returned to
places many times. During my last visit there there was no other
stars in the sky, possibly due to Oblong, like our own Sol, drowning
out their light.


Furthermore,
I was on another shoreline because then, there had been a towering
cliff blocking my direction one way. The oblong star had transfixed
me to the point where I had only stood there throughout the visit and
stared at its beauty. Now that I was back, I wanted to explore my
surroundings.  


I
decided to check out the forest which seemed so thick just by sight I
would not be able to enter but wanted a closer look. I began the few
steps to the forest but stopped. The ground felt oddly spongy. I bent
down and ran my hand over the surface.


Expecting
to move some sand around, I found the surface entirely smooth, spongy
and warm. Pushing my hand down, I could compress the materiel two to
three inches, feeling as though there may have been a harder surface
below.


I
pressed my finger and thumb into it and easily pinched a bit of the
material between my fingers. I could pull up what I held only about
an inch. I pulled a little harder, sure I might tear off some for a
closer inspection, but  stopped and released what I had.


The
surface quickly bounced back as if it had never been disturbed. Still
kneeling down I looked up and down the shore. Even in the low light I
could see in the distance that this material making up the shore had
not one blemish.  


I
stood up and walked over to the foliage, my footsteps silent across
the surface. I stopped within inches of the leafy brush not sure if
it were trees, bushes or even vines. The edge of the forest held a
crooked but well-defined border out to each horizon. There were
various plants that sprung from the ground so thick that the spongy
surface disappeared. As the foliage grew it spread out entangling
itself. Even if there had been enough light, I was sure I could have
only seen in a few feet.


From
some of the growth blossomed leaves about as wide as my hand. The
shape reminded me of the elephant ear plants on earth, but these,
like the other planet life, were a lot darker. The colors were
different shades of darkness but due to the dim light; I was unable
to see their true color. The feel of the leaves was smooth and glossy
like that of an evergreen shrub.


The
ways the leaves grew were very different. Where the petiole met the
leaf, it separated and ran around the edge of the leaf instead up
through the middle as a midrib. From that outer rib, the small veins
ran to the middle of the leaf like many crooked spokes of a wheel
which met in the middle.


I
looked on the ground for some fallen leaves but saw none. I was ready
to pull off the leaf I held in my hand but stopped. The foliage, like
the spongy surface, was unblemished. No leaves, sticks or any other
plant debris littered the ground.   


I
searched the top of the growth which rose possibly 50 to 60 or more
feet. As I explored the tops, I saw a twinkle of light or reflection
at the top of the tallest plants. Other lights began to flicker at
the top slowly working their way toward the ground. I stepped back to
watch the sight which was dim but noticeable. I stepped back several
more feet to get a look up and down the line of foliage. The tops of
these alien trees were brighter, with the effect flowing downward
until it reached the ground.


A
reflection.” I thought.


I
turned to the sea and far off in the horizon a spotlight shone toward
me. The light did not waver other than in intensity, and I quickly
realized this was not some alien spotlight but the rising sun of an
alien world. I walked to the waters edge and sat.


The
small ripples only came up a few inches, seeming to be soaked up by
the shore. I reached down to  dip a finger in the water. I
pulled it out and sniffed. There was no smell, so I dabbed the finger
on my tongue, tasting the water. It had a weak brackish water taste.
 


I
watched as the sun rose past its midpoint exposing the elongated form
while washing out other stars nearby. I sat back on the ground a
couple of feet from the water with my legs crossed. Exploration would
find more of the same and I decided to just enjoy the moment.


To
me, one of the hardest things to accomplish in dreams and/ or OBEs is
just to  relax. Rarely are there times in them that do not call
for some exploration or adventure. I took this opportunity to listen
for sounds, but this was a silent world. Occasionally, I could pick
up the faint rustle of the plant life as a light breeze every now and
then moved through.


My
mind slipped into the everyday thoughts, namely art. I had many
things that I wanted to do to express some artistic talent I might
have. Writing had been on the forefront, one reason I kept journals.
I had wanted to draw or paint and had in the last couple of years
bought many books and instruction manuals to help me.


I
envisioned bringing my worlds and travels to this would through
drawings. I could see a bit of progress in some areas, but I could
never spend the amounted time in practice. I had fantasized of taking
a class in sculpting to create images of the many creatures I have
met through my journeys but that would have been too time consuming
also.  


I
stretched out my legs and leaned back, propping myself up with my
arms behind me. Oblong had now fully risen and the light it shone
reflected off the waters surface in a path between it and me. The
surrounding sea seemed to hold a faint aura, which should have
weakened  farther away from the sun’s glow, but it did not. A
spark of realization hit me, and I went to my feet. I stepped into
the water just enough so I could scoop up some in my cupped hands.  


I
turned away from the star and held the water in my hands close to my
body blocking as much light as I could from the liquid. I made out
the lines and creases in the palms of my hands through the small
puddle of water, not because of the light from Oblong but from the
water. I had reasoned being able to see so well, before Oblong had
risen, as something celestial in my sight. That was not it— the
water gave off light. A faint glow, even throughout the sea, enough
that brighten this world. I allowed the water to run onto the ground.


The
spot it splashed upon lit a bit brighter than the surrounding area.
Bioluminescent plankton—the oceans must be filled with it. This is
why everything looked so fresh and undisturbed; life had yet to
evolve past plant form. A new world in its first state of creating
life, or perhaps a very old world that kept life simple.


I
took in the world through all five senses. Back in my world, I would
need to record it all. I had to study and memorize everything in
great detail, so I could share this experience with everyone. A quote
came to me although, I could not recall the exact words at the time,
it was close enough to bring an awareness to me. The original quote
is,


“In
every block of marble I see a statue as plain as though it stood
before me, shaped and perfect in attitude and action. I have only to
hew away the rough walls that imprison the lovely apparition to
reveal it to the other eyes as mine see it.” -Michelangelo


One
of my main focuses’ in life is the skill I continually work at to
visit these extraordinary places, beings and dimensions. To come back
and reveal to others my experiences on the other side of that wall.
Like the phone number on my phones for so many years, I now saw what
I had been overlooking, “I am an Artist.”



The Black of Day

Sunday, July 14, 2013
5:11 a.m.
Dream;

I had  driven a loaded tractor trailer to a shipyard. I was in the process of cleaning off the deck of the trailer that had just been unloaded. I stopped briefly to wipe away a bit of sweat that had built up on my forehead. As I did, I looked up into the sky. It was a beautiful deep blue with the sun hanging about two hours from sunset. I stared for a while, because the sky seemed bluer than I had ever seen. I bent back down and picked up the binders that were used to tie down the load. At the front of the trailer, I dropped them inside their storage box.
 
I glanced up again at the blue sky, scanning as I did. To the east, I could just see the wisps of dark clouds rising above the horizon. I went back to clear off the trailer when a pickup truck pulled along side the trailer facing north. Inside was a cousin of mine, Kenny, whom I had not seen in over a year. I climbed down from the trailer and walked up to his truck. He stepped out of his truck, noticing me; we embraced. Just before stepping back from him, I glanced up into the sky. Strands of the approaching clouds flowed across the sky like black ink moving through water. I turned back to Kenny.

“What are you doing out here?” I asked. Kenny informed me that he worked here, and needed to locate a truck to move some equipment from the east end of the shipyard back down to the west end. He had seen the tractor trailer here but had had no idea I was the driver. 

“I can drive you to the area where the equipment is, just to make sure you can get back in there,” Kenny said.

“That’s fine, just give me a minute to close up my truck.”

Kenny got into his pickup while I closed the door on my truck. I looked back into the sky once again. The strands of the murky clouds snaked through the blue sky like tree limbs growing in fast motion.

“They’re just so black,” I said to myself and thought that perhaps it may be smoke. They were coming from the direction Kenny would be taking me, so I could get a better look at them. I got into the pickup with Kenny, and we pulled out on the shipyard’s main road. Kenny did all the talking, but I cannot recall any of his conversations because only the sky held my attention.

The shipyard was along a river, and I had a lot more of the horizon towards the north in my view. I could see the main body of the cloud stretching from north to south in a circular form. The outer edge was thin with the strands pouring over the tops and racing out in front. Farther into the clouds,  they became thicker, darker and much lower to the ground. I looked out of the front window of the pickup following the downward slope to a pair of tall buildings in the far distance. Briefly, I thought the storm’s main body was hovering low enough to skim over the tops of buildings, but then I noticed the clouds pushing upward from them.

I did not want to believe what I was looking at because it sickened me. These were not buildings; they were smokestacks, the largest I ever saw— possibly 25 to 30 stories high, if not more and their width at least 200 feet but still did not seem wide enough to pump out the thick black clouds of whatever it was bellowing from their mouths.

“Kenny!” I burst out, “What are those things?” I yelled, hoping my eyes were deceiving me.

“Smokestacks,” he replied in a monotone voice.

“What for?” I asked.

“A factory,” he replied without emotion.

“What could any factory be building, to push out pollutants in that amount?”

“Wbufhjmn fibcdv bfjx dgdkbg,” Kenny spoke out in some gibberish that made no sense.

“What? What did you say?”

“Wbufhjmn fibcdv bfjx dgdkbg”.

Still his speech was incomprehensible. I looked at the stacks to see if they were part of the shipyard. Sizeable buildings stood around the stacks. In front of the large buildings, smaller buildings stood, all of which looked like dark brown and black boxes. Even though some of the buildings stood three to five stories, there were no windows or designs on them, only a door here and there. I could tell due to the size of the area it was on that the “factory” was not within the confines of the yard.

“Well, at least this close to the yard, someone in the government will see them and put a stop to whatever they are doing.”

“The government passed all their permits; they can’t touch the factory now,” he said.

“Nevertheless, that crap they’re pumping out is filling the sky!” I was raising my voice.

Around the factory, lights throughout the parking lot and outside for the buildings began turning on. A gloomy shadow suddenly passed over us and lights in the city across the river came on as if  night had fallen. I turned and looked through the back window, the sun had vanished behind the black clouds, its light quickly absorbed in the blackening sky.

“How long is this going to go on?” I asked Kenny.

He looked at me as if I should have known the answer myself.
“Indefinitely,” this time he  answered in a more depressing tone.

“Are you serious? That’s impossible, at that rate.” I threw my hand out the window, shaking my finger at the top of the stacks. “That stuff is going to cover the entire sky of the planet before long!” I was shouting now, hoping people outside would hear and to draw attention to the factory.

“Yea, I know. That really sucks too. Change the subject,” he said, “I don’t want to talk about it any longer.”

Kenny watched the road in front of him; I watched the passenger side mirror. I could see the edge of the shadow moving along the ground and climbing up and over buildings. It pushed away the sunshine and replaced it with a hazy darkness. The flickering of streetlights and indoor lighting came to life, following seconds behind the edge of the darkness. I watched as the last bit of sunlight was driven away, hunting and hoping as I looked through the side mirror for any ray of sunlight that had broken through; but from then until the time I awoke, there was none.